The iPad mini: 2013’s next big business tool?

When the iPad debuted, many called it “just a big iPod touch.” Most soon realized that such claims were misguided, as the iPad turned out to be much more: more powerful, more capable, more useful, more everything. Instead of being arithmetically bigger than the iPod touch, the iPad offered exponentially more of what was good about it.

Now that the iPad mini is out, some of the same people are calling it “just a smaller iPad.” This time around, such a description is much more apt, as the iPad mini offers nearly all of the features, power, and capabilities of its full-size siblings. It even runs all the same apps. The result is a device that—far more than the Mac mini, or even the old iPod mini—gives you nearly everything of its non-mini namesake in a smaller package.

Not long after the iPad mini launched last fall, many corporate workers, started using the device to make business presentations.

Convenience was one reason: The iPad mini has all the capabilities of its bigger predecessor, including wireless AirPlay mirroring that allows them to project the tablet’s screen onto a nearby TV. Salesmanship was another factor, too: There’s nothing like arriving at a meeting, seemingly empty-handed, only to pull the latest and greatest Apple technology from a jacket pocket.

Two institutions that can benefit greatly from the iPad mini are schools and hospitals. The first is understandable. Schools looking to cut down on technology costs can provide an iPad mini to students at almost half the cost of the full sized iPad.

But why hospitals? For an unexpected reason: The 7.87-inch-long iPad mini is just the right size to fit in the 8.5-inch-deep pocket of a standard medical lab coat. From a form factor standpoint, doctors can now carry the mini device around in their coat pockets. This effectively means that their electronic medical records, order entry, reference materials, and imaging capabilities are within arm’s reach at all times.

Previous iOS devices entered the workplace quickly, but by wildly different routes.

The iPhone, for example, was initially disdained by IT departments that had built their security infrastructure to support the then-dominant Blackberry line of phones from Research in Motion. But the iPhone elbowed its way into the office anyway, initially brought in by top executives and then, increasingly, their underlings—forcing IT departments to adapt. The “bring your own” approach worked for Apple: More than five years later the iPhone is one of the dominant smartphones in the enterprise market.

The iPad, in contrast, was more immediately embraced by institutions—and ended up being distributed in businesses and other workplaces on more of a top-down basis. Within months of its 2010 launch, the tablet was at work in car dealerships, cockpits, and medical schools, as

institutions recognized that it could help reduce paperwork and provide more mobility to users than traditional laptop computers.

Analysts say that they expect the iPad mini to follow the iPhone’s trail into the workplace, arriving initially as a BYO device before institutions grasp how to use the small tablet to their advantage.

Both the iPad and iPad mini are available at Global Technology Inc the only authorized Apple Reseller in Guyana. Visit our show room at 210 Camp & New Market St and find the device that will make you a success in 2013.

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